Sirens and Chrome Wow at Concours d’Elegance of America

AutoInformed.com

In the book – the movie is more dramatic – Krevsky reveals whose “body” inspired the Rolls-Royce Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament.

Thousands of spectators who gushed over the most beautiful, expensive machines in the world at Concours d’Elegance of America in Plymouth, Michigan this past weekend may have noticed a crew filming scenes for a movie. Owners of 374 classic and rare cars displayed their vehicles on the sprawling grounds of St. John’s made for an interesting backdrop.

The production underway called “Sirens of Chrome” is based on a coffee-table book by Margery Krevsky that chronicles decades of the most beautiful cars and the women who adorned them. The Concours served as the elegant setting for excellent automobiles and the “sirens” who evoked a touch of Hollywood glamor. 

In the book – the movie is more dramatic – Krevsky reveals whose “body” inspired the Rolls-Royce Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament. She allows you to sit in a “rumble seat” with 1930s silver-screen goddess Joan Blondell. You can gawk at the over-the-top opulence of the Somali leopard pelt-upholstered 1950 Cadillac Debutante, sing along with Dinah Shore while you “See the U.S.A. in Your Chevrolet,” or shake your head in wonder at the fur bikini-clad model improbably posed atop a Soviet-built Lada. Enjoy the ride! (Sirens of Chrome: The Enduring Allure of Auto Show Models is published by Momentum Books.)

The movie will encapsulate the transformation of auto show models from “eye candy” to product specialists, and the fusion of fashion and auto industries, both of which rely on glamor, style and image to move the merchandise. The biggest and most recognizable brands in the world will appear as producer John P. Lauri documents his travels to auto shows across the globe. “Sirens of Chrome” is scheduled for release in 2014.

Organizers of the 35th Annual Concours d’Elegance of America in Plymouth are calling this year’s event a “complete success,” with a crowd estimated at more than 10,000. Nearly 90% of the cars up for auction sold, with a total selling price of $7,502,350. The highest priced car was the 1929 Duesenberg Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton that sold for $682,000.

Read AutoInformed on: Detroit Electric Roadster at Concours d’Elegance of America

This entry was posted in aftermarket, auto news, design and styling, people and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.