TSB Investigating Quebec Drone Crash with Passenger Aircraft

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is investigating the collision between a drone and a passenger aircraft that took place on approach to Jean Lesage International Airport (CYQB) in Québec City, Quebec with 2 crew members and 6 passengers on board.

The Beechcraft King Air turboprop was approaching runway 24 and had just completed the final approach fix when the crew noticed a drone – an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) – at the extremity of the left wing. The aircraft hit the UAV at an altitude of 1500 feet and the crew declared an emergency.

Aircraft rescue and firefighting services were deployed and the aircraft safely landed on runway 24. The aircraft inspection revealed a few scratches and some paint transfer on the top surface of the left wing and scrape marks on the de-icing boot. The aircraft was then returned to service.

No one was injured, but could have been far worse if the drone hit the windshield or on of the engines,

The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Investigator-in-Charge

Kristina Schoos has more than 15 years of experience as a helicopter pilot with various 702 and 703 operators, during which she has accumulated more than 6000 hours of flying time across the country on 6 different types of helicopter including the Bell 206 and Aerospatiale AS350. During her career, she has been responsible for flight and ground training and worked as Assistant chief-pilot. Kristina also holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Transportation Safety Board investigation process

There are 3 phases to a TSB investigation:

  1. Field phase: a team of investigators examines the occurrence site and wreckage, interviews witnesses and collects pertinent information.
  2. Examination and analysis phase: the TSB reviews pertinent records, tests components of the wreckage in the lab, determines the sequence of events and identifies safety deficiencies. When safety deficiencies are suspected or confirmed, the TSB advises the appropriate authority without waiting until publication of the final report.
  3. Report phase: a confidential draft report is approved by the Board and sent to persons and corporations who are directly concerned by the report. They then can dispute or correct information they believe to be incorrect. The Board considers all representations before approving the final report, which is subsequently released to the public.

 

 

About Ken Zino

Ken Zino is an auto industry veteran with global experience in print and electronic media. He has auto testing, marketing, public relations and communications expertise garnered while working in Asia, Europe and the U.S.

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